Interstellar

SHARE

(2014) ★★★★

Sky Movies Premiere: PREMIERE Friday 21 August, 3.15pm and 8pm

When the earth turns against Earth, its blighted dirt and dust storms laying waste to crops, Matthew McConaughey takes one small step for mankind, one giant leap for his family back home on the farm.

McConaughey’s the pilot on a secret Nasa mission to find a new hospitable planet for humanity. Not in our galaxy. There is none. But through a wormhole near the rings of Saturn. A dangerous expedition kept secret for two reasons. Space exploration is a no-go when people are starving. And there’s no reason to suppose it will succeed.

“I’m not afraid of death,” says the project’s guiding light, professor Michael Caine. “I’m an old physicist. I’m afraid of time.” Christopher Nolan’s space odyssey, written in conjunction with his brother Jonathan, is a mighty impressive dip into the abyss of black holes and hostile planets. Walls of water, frozen clouds and a multi-dimensional ‘memory palace’ that must surely be alien handiwork… or is it?

 

Nolan’s Endurance test is the antithesis of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001 trip through the looking glass. Kubrick’s 20th century contention was that man, however technically savvy, would never evolve emotionally beyond the level of a bone-throwing ape without assistance from an outside agency. Interstellar, which seems to be headed that way, lets the plot slip though its fingers in the Escher-like ‘memory palace’, an intervention not so much divine as divisive. Compared to Kubrick’s clinical rigour, it’s an imitation endgame. And compared to Nolan’s own mind-blowing Inception, Interstellar is somehow less strange and resonant, a bait-and-switch trick without a feasible payoff.

The most reliable members of the Endurance crew are the two robots, Tars and Case. Tars is the talkative one, with a 100% setting for humour, 90% for honesty. Because complete honesty is not diplomatic when dealing with emotional beings. Both Kubrick and Nolan understand this, yet deal with it in utterly opposite ways.

 

“Once you’re parents,” muses McConaughey in wistful Moody Blues vein, “you’re the ghosts of your children’s future.” Johnny Depp’s Transcendence never did transcend such trite sentiments. Interstellar does, and often. Behold its amazing sights unseen – that wall of water is truly terrifying.

They’re very different films yet Transcendence and Interstellar come to the same conclusion: love conquers all. Which somehow sounded better when The Beatles said it. Still, Interstellar demonstrates once again that when it comes to mega-budget movie making, Christopher Nolan is a singularity man.

Despite the cosmic terrors and eventful horizons, it is a more mellow movie than anything he’s previously directed. Even Inception had to be unusually cruel to be kind. As to the picture’s astrophysics, it’s obviously more out there than Alfonso Cuarón’s Earth-bound Gravity. I’m with McConaughey’s daughter: “Science is about admitting what you don’t know.” And, by definition, science-fiction isn’t real. It only needs to appear to be possible.

Every Christopher Nolan film ranked from best to worst. How does Interstellar fare?

Certificate: 12

Duration: 169min

IMDB – Interstellar

TMDB – Interstellar

Rotten Tomatoes – Interstellar

Other Showings Time & Date
Sky Movies Premiere Saturday, 22 August at 3:15PM
Sky Movies Premiere Saturday, 22 August at 8:00PM
Sky Movies Premiere Sunday, 23 August at 3:15PM
Sky Movies Premiere Sunday, 23 August at 8:00PM
Sky Movies Premiere Monday, 24 August at 3:15PM
Sky Movies Premiere Monday, 24 August at 8:00PM
Sky Movies Premiere Tuesday, 25 August at 3:15PM
Sky Movies Premiere Tuesday, 25 August at 8:00PM
Sky Movies Premiere Wednesday, 26 August at 3:15PM
Sky Movies Premiere Wednesday, 26 August at 8:00PM
Sky Movies Premiere Thursday, 27 August at 3:15PM
Sky Movies Premiere Thursday, 27 August at 8:00PM
Sky Movies Showcase Sunday, 30 August at 1:30PM
Sky Movies Showcase Sunday, 30 August at 8:00PM